Front Page News

By Bill Liles, NQ6Z

Editor’s Note: The HamSCI-related eclipse efforts comprise of a number of sub-projects. This article describes the EclipseMob project, which is an experiment led by a team at George Mason University and the University of Massachusetts at Boston. EclipseMob will study eclipse-driven ionospheric effects using the Very Low Frequency (VLF) and Low Frequency (LF) bands. Results of this experiment could aid in understanding propagation at the proposed 2,200 meter ham band.

Since 1912 there have been many efforts to collect and analyze data during a solar eclipse to help understand the ionosphere. These efforts have been conducted in frequencies ranging from VLF to VHF.  In most cases, individuals or small teams have collected data from disparate transmitters.

On behalf of Flávio Jorge, Chairman and Organizing Committee Member:
The Ether Talks is a radiocommunications congress that takes place at University of Aveiro, Portugal, on Saturday, March 4th 2017. Similarly to the previous editions, on this 3rd edition it is bringing together all the radioelectric sciences enthusiasts, and especially two big communities: the amateur radios community and the academic one.

HamSCI scientists met at the Fall American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in San Francisco during the week of December 11–17, 2016. The Fall AGU meeting is one of the largest gatherings of geoscientists in the world, with approximately 24,000 people attending. During the meeting, HamSCI scientists presented ham radio-based research, discussed possibilities for upcoming experiments, and networked with members of both the Citizen Science and Space Science Communities.

On October 19 – 20, 2016, two new Reverse Beacon Network (RBN) receivers were installed at the United Astronomy Clubs of New Jersey (UACNJ) Observatory at Jenny Jump State Park in Hope, NJ. These receivers, assigned call signs K2MFF-2 and K2MFF-3, are sponsored by the New Jersey Institute of Technology Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research (NJIT-CSTR). These receivers will listen for amateur radio Morse Code signals on the high frequency (HF, 1.8–30 MHz) bands and report “spots” back to the main RBN web site. These spots will be used by ham radio operators to find other hams to communicate with, and by scientists to study shortwave propagation and the ionosphere.

The November Frequency Measuring Test will begin at 0000 UTC, November 3 (8:00 PM EDT November 2).  Transmissions will take place on three bands: 20, 40, and 80 meters. The 20 meter transmission will have two parts - the first beaming east from California and the second beaming toward Japan. Participants are to submit only one 20 meter measurement, but are encouraged to measure both transmissions and compare the measured frequency and signal characteristics in their comments.

The IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (AP-S) has announced the 8th IEEE AP-S Antenna Design Contest for undergraduate and graduate students. The goal for teams: "Design and build a cubesat antenna for enabling high-performance communications with a ground station." Preliminary design proposals are due by November 28, 2016 and the finalist teams will present their work at the IEEE AP-S Symposium in July.

In “The Reverse Beacon Network” (Oct. 2016 QST, pp. 30-32), Pete Smith, N4ZR, and Ward Silver, N0AX explain how the Reverse Beacon Network (RBN) is used to observe and report both CW and RTTY communications to the DX spotting network and to a data archive. This article explains how to be spotted by the RBN, how to download RBN data, and also how to become an RBN receiving node.


In “The New Sunspot Numbers” (Oct. 2016 QST, pp. 38-41), Carl Luetzelschwab, K9LA, reviews the history of sunspot numbers and how they are calculated, as well as explains a new formulation of sunspot numbers in use by the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Sunspot numbers are important because they are correlated with the atmospheric ionization on Earth.

In an article by Ward Silver, N0AX, the American Radio Relay League has featured HamSCI in the August 2016 (Pages 68-71) issue of QST.  Ward's article discusses some history of amateur radio involvement in science, the vision of HamSCI, and a description of ham radio activities for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse. Download a free PDF of the full article here.

In addition, the August 2016 QST inlcudes a full-page profile of HamSCI member Magda Moses, KM4EGE (Page 13). Congratulations, Magda!


Researchers and HamSCI volunteers meet at the 2016 Dayton Hamvention to plan the 2017 Solar Eclipse QSO Party. (Left to Right) Magda Moses KM4EGE, Nathaniel Frissell W2NAF, Ward Silver N0AX. Photo by Bob McGwier N4HY.